Philosophical Profiles

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Philosophical Profiles is a series of interviews with distinguished and influential philosophers working on a range of issues of interdisciplinary interest, from Political Philosophy, the rights and status of children, Bioethics, Sex and Gender, the nature of free will, personhood, right through to the physical structure of the universe. Each philosopher discusses his or her particular area of focus and how he or she became interested in that area in a way that should be accessible to a general audience.

Susan Wolf

Susan Wolf is Edna J. Koury Distinguished Professor of Philosophy of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She first burst on the scene in the early eighties with a trio of truly seminal papers: "Asymmetrical Freedom," "The Importance of Free Will" and "Moral Saints." Since then she has published prolifically primarily in two areas: free will and responsibility, and moral and non-moral values, her papers on the latter of which have just been collected in The Variety of Values: Essays on Morality, Meaning & Love (Oxford, 2015). A second volume of her papers on responsibility will follow soon, or her long-suffering editor will want to know why not. Professor Wolf is a big fan of crusty British Philosophers Peter Strawson and Bernard Williams and, what's worse, actually reads Henry James novels for pleasure. But she will allow that it may be possible to have a meaningful life even if you don't.

 

ERIC OLSON

Philosophy has brought Eric Olson from the deserts of Eastern Washington State to Cambridge, and thence to the home of Stainless Steel and The Full Monty, where he is Professor of Philosophy at Sheffield University. He is known for his rejection of the orthodox view of personal identity associated with everyone from John Locke to Derek Parfit and his stubborn insistence that we are animals, a view which he has defended in numerous articles and his two books, The Human Animal (1997) and What Are We? (2007, both Oxford University Press). He enjoys running and currently his thoughts are turning to the topic of death, although the two are unrelated.

DAVID SHOEMAKER

David Shoemaker is Associate Professor in the Department of Philosophy and the Murphy Institute of Tulane University. His areas of interest lie predominantly in the topics of personal identity and moral responsibility. He runs the biennial New Orleans Workshop on Agency and Responsibility, out of which come the Oxford University Press series Studies in Agency and Responsibility, for which he is the editor. He has written a bewildering profusion of articles for leading journals, and three books, the most recent of which is Responsibility from the Margins, hot off the presses from Oxford. No library is complete without a copy. He is the co-founder and co-editor of PEA Soup. David will fight anybody who questions the notion that Peter Strawson's article "Freedom and Resentment" is the greatest article in the last 60 or so years. Don't get him started on psychopaths.

 

MARYA SCHECHTMAN

Marya Schechtman is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Illinois at Chicago, where she is also a member of the Laboratory of Integrated Neuroscience. She got her Ph.D. in Philosophy at Harvard, and her dissertation on personal identity became her first book, The Constitution of Selves (Cornell, 1996). In this work she argues that the dominant view of personal identity most famously defended by Sidney Shoemaker and modified by Derek Parfit, which takes the work of John Locke as inspiration, misses out a vital element of Locke's view. She defends what she calls The Narrative Self-Constitution View. This view became influential, and therefore a target for criticism, from the burgeoning animalist movement in the philosophy of personal identity on one side, and from what the philosopher Galen Strawson calls "episodics" on the other. In her new book, Staying Alive: Personal Identity, Practical Concerns, and the Unity of Life (Oxford, 2014), she responds to the critiques and advances the Person Life View, which takes persons as essentially situated within cultures.

WALTER SINNOTT-ARMSTRONG

Walter Sinnott-Armstrong is many things and does many more. Besides being Chauncey Stillman Professor of Practical Ethics in the Department of Philosophy and the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke University, he is also a faculty member of the Duke Institute for Brain Sciences, the Duke Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, and the Duke Center for Interdisciplinary Decision Sciences and a Partner Investigator at the Oxford Centre for Neuroethics, and Research Scientist with The Mind Research Network in New Mexico. He has been invited to prestigious institutions the world over, from Taiwan to Australia, from Oxford to Harvard and Princeton. His interests range from the straightforwardly analytic to the full-on empirical. Areas he has worked in straddle the normative, legal and scientific and most recently include neuroprediction of crime, neural detection of consciousness in brain-damaged patients, psychopaths, free will and moral responsibility, and the neural basis of moral judgments. He has also taken the atheist side in debates with Christian philosopher William Lane Craig and has strong opinions about online teaching.

 

Elizabeth Anderson

Elizabeth Anderson, besides being a 2013 Guggenheim fellow and Arthur F. Thurnau Professor at the University of Michigan, recently transitioned from being the John Rawls Collegiate Professor to the John Dewey Distinguished University Professor of Philosophy and Women’s Studies. She has written on a wide range of normative issues, including surrogacy, dependent care, animal rights, affirmative action and the theories of John Stuart Mill and Immanuel Kant. In her 1999 article, "What is the Point of Equality?," she coined the term "luck egalitarianism" for the then dominant view of egalitarianism in political philosophy, even though her intent was just to have a name for the obituary. Her article "If God is Dead, is Everything Permitted?" was included in Christopher Hitchens' anthology The Portable Atheist. Her most recent book, The Imperative of Integration was winner of the 2011 Joseph B. Gittler Award from the American Philosophical Association. She is currently writing a history of egalitarian movements.

Allen Buchanan

Allen Buchanan wears many hats. In the Fall, he is the James B. Duke Professor of Philosophy at Duke University. In the Spring, he jets off to Tucson, where he is a Research Professor at the Freedom Center at the University of Arizona. Finally, in May and June he is to be found in London, at the Dickson Poon School of Law at King's College, where he is Professor of Philosophy of International Law. His teaching and research focus on political philosophy, philosophy of international law, social/moral epistemology, and bioethics. His most recent books include: Justice and Health Care: Selected Essays, Human Rights, Legitimacy, and the Use of Force: Selected Essays, Beyond Humanity? The Ethics of Biomedical Enhancement. We interviewed him on the day he moved into a new flat for his time in London.

 

Editor

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SIMON CUSHING, PH.D.

Advisory Board Member
Associate Professor and Chair, University of Michigan-Flint Philosophy Department
simoncu@umflint.edu

I have diverse interests and have written in political philosophy, ethical theory, metaphysics and philosophy of religion. Most recently I presented a paper on "The Metaphysics of Autism" at an interdisciplinary conference in England. It was an adaptation of my chapter from the anthology I co-edited with Jami, The Philosophy of Autism. Next, I hope to return to the issues of moral personhood that I last addressed in my article "Against Humanism," but this time informed by my evolving views on personal identity and what constitutes a good life. Besides Philosophy, my work has drawn from and responded to work in Psychology, Sociology and Anthropology. After receiving a B.A. and M.A. in Politics, Philosophy and Economics at Oxford University, I earned a Ph.D. from the University of Southern California, where my dissertation was "Citizenship, Political Obligation, and the "Right-Based” Social Contract Tradition."

 

Operations

Production of Philosophical Profiles is under the aegis of the Journal of Cognition and Neuroethics.

For additional information, please contact Simon Cushing by emailing cushing@cognethic.org.

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